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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
This how to is intended for users of MIMB ONLY, it is based off of a current production kit with minor changes.

NOTE: I do not know ANY of the names of the PVC couplers, so please excuse my layman terms!


This relocates the Air and CVT Intake 12" higher than stock, and the CVT Exhaust 20" higher than stock.
It increases the Air intake diameter to 2", which results in no HP loss, from bends in snorkel.
Remove all burrs and stickers so they do not get sucked into airbox and CVT.
Test fit all pieces before final gluing.
Placing hand over finshed air intake with ATV at idle, is a good procedure for testing leaks on air intake only. ATV should stall out.
Review all pictures and pieces before installing.

First things first...parts list!!!

I got all this at Lowes. They have the short sweep connectors. DO NOT ATTEMPT to do this without them...you can get all the way to the pod but it won't allow the cvt exhaust to be in the right place.

Airbox

Metal exhaust adapter 1.5"
1.5" to 1.5" rubber coupler
(2)1.5" 22.5* male to female
1.5-2" PVC adapter

Cvt exhaust (left side)

2" metal shielded rubber coupler
1.5" 90*
1.5" 45*
1.5" 90*
1.5" 90* female to male
1.5" 90* female to female

For the riser you need:
1.5" 90*
1.5" slip coupler
(2) 1.5" 45

Cvt intake

2" Rubber coupler (to be able to remove snorkels)
2" to 1.5 PVC adapter
1.5" 90 male to female
1.5" 90*
1.5" 90* male to female
22.5 female to female

For the riser you need:
1.5" 90*
1.5" slip coupler
(2) 1.5" 45



Step 1: remove side panels and prep bike for installation of snorkel by removing stock CVT intake snorkel, and the boot on the CVT exhaust snorkel.

Cut the air intake snorkel to a length of 4"

Cut the under-hood plastics as specified in the pictures

Trim off tabs on airbox as specified in pictures, it is easiest to use a grinder









YOU DO NOT HAVE TO REMOVE IT, I AM SHOWING THESE PICTURES SO YOU GET A GOOD IDEA OF WHAT TO CUT




















Now cut out the pod for the snorkels. I do this first so that I line everything up correctly.

Use a 2.5" hole saw for the center snorkel, and a 2.25" hole saw for the cvt's



Now for the snorkels...

Airbox:

Cut off the stock airbox tube so that only 4" is left on it
Slide in the metal coupler and clamp it down
Slide the 1.5" rubber coupler over that

Now assemble the airbox snorkel




Use a short piece of PVC to slip into the rubber coupler
Connected to EITHER two male to female 22.5's or two regular 22.5's. It depends what you can source, the male to female 22.5's do give you a lot more room for the CVT snorkel to cross under!!!
Then a short piece of PVC to the 1.5-2 adapter
Test fit this all together

NEXT the CVT intake

With the stock CVT intake removed, leaving the boot on the cvt cover, you will re use the stock boot. It is plenty strong and seals great.

You are going to assemble a 1.5-2 adapater, the 2" part goes into the cvt cover and gets clamped down
Then a 1.5" 90 male to female
A short riser to go over the power steering
Two 90* 1.5's, one is male to female, one is female to female, this will get you up around the power steering
A short piece of PVC for the rubber coupler to connect to (so you can break the snorkels apart)
Then the rubber coupler, and then a riser to the airbox area
A short sweep 90* 1.5"
A short piece of pvc to go across to the right side
Then to a 45* female to female which is where you snorkel riser will connect to









Next is the CVT Exhaust

Use a 2" shielded rubber coupler onto the stock CVT exhaust tube
To a 1.5" 90
Short piece of PVC
1.5" 45*
Short piece of PVC
To a 1.5" 90*
Small piece of PVC
To the rubber coupler
Then a riser up to the airbox area
Then a short sweep male to female 90, then a short sweep female to female 90











Under the pod






















The only vent line I re-routed was the front diff, all others were fine.

USE di-electric grease on all connectors, including ignition and ECU
 

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I'll never complain about snorks on a brute force, that looks complicated. You done a great job!!
 

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For those of you that thought maybe you would take a more expensive/less work short-cut and just order the CVT Exhuast Snorkle off of a '13 XMR... Just part 706600020. Im guessing you have to purchase part 706600019 With it as well. As the air outlet on the XMR is shorter than the '12 outty. So between those 2 parts you have $75 wrapped up....I think I'll skip it and just pipe it all with PVC.
Hopefully my dealer doesnt charge some horrible restocking fee.

On one plus side, the xxx20 part is all soft rubber. I would think the plastics should line up excellent with it as compared to doing all hard PVC.
 

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jrpro130 tracked me down on another forum. I took his original build, made a few adjustments, gathered the names of the components used and made another write up. At his request, I am posting my write up here as well.

First off I must tip my hat to those out there that have ventured into building their own snorks and those out there that took the time to produce kits for resale. Even working from someone elses description of a build, it is not the easiest task. A lot of trial and error, fitting and taking apart along with many trips back and forth from Lowe's to get the correct pieces needed.

I read an article posted from a user on a different forum and figured since someone else had already done most of the work, how hard could it be. Following another persons build is not always the easiest way out.

Since I followed another build and believe that my process will be better understood by others, I figured I would share it with everyone else whom may want to venture and build their own snorks.

As fair warning, if you are one of those that does not like the idea of cutting up the plastics on a brand new ride, then this is not a process you may want to venture into. There is a lot of cutting to make all components fit right albeit to replace all pieces that you cut is elatively inexpensive.

With that being said, lets get started.........

Components descriptions

With all elbows there are several different types. There is a Sweep, a Vent and Standard. A Sweep is a wide radius bend. Fortunately none are used in this build. A Vent is a very tight radius in the bend and a Standard is in between the two.

There are several different connection types used in my build. There is Male to Female (may also be referred to a Street in elbows), Female to Female.

First up, quickest and easiest assembly to build is the airbox intake.

Parts needed in order of building the assembly.

1 1/2" diameter galvanized fence post - approx 4" long
1 1/2" Rubber coupler
1 1/2" PVC tubing - approx 4" long
1 1/2" 22.5* Street elbow
1 1/2" 22.5* Steet elbow
1 1/2" to 2" PVC coupler

To assemble, cut the factory rubber intake tube so that only about 4" of it is left. Insert the galvanized pipe section half way into the intake tube and put a hose clamp on it. Attach the rubber coupler to the other end of the galvanized pipe. Take the rest of the components and assemble. The 4" long section of the PVC tubing will connect to the two 22.5* street elbows and those to the PVC coupler. You should end up with an assembly that looks like this.




Up next...... CVT Intake

Parts list

1 1/2" 90* standard elbow - F to F
1 1/2" PVC tubing - approx 3 1/4" long
1 1/2" 90* standard elbow - F to F
1 1/2" PVC tubing - approx 1 1/4" long
1 1/2" 90* standard elbow - F to F
1 1/2" PVC tubing - approx 2" long
1 1/2" Rubber coupler
1 1/2" 22.5* Street elbow
1 1/2" PVC tubing - approx 3 1/2" long
1 1/2" 90* vent elbow - F to F
1 1/2" PVC tubing
1 1/2" PVC tubing - approx 5" long
1 1/2" 45* elbow

Using the stock rubber boot on the CVT intake, insert the first 90* elbow. The first section tubing to start the journey upwards. The second 90* elbow to get you over the top of the DPS. A short section of pvc tubing to connect the two 90's together and then the third 90* elbow to get you pointing to the top of the bike again. A short piece of tubing to attach the rubber coupler to. Next piece in the puzzle is the 22.5* elbow. This is needed due to the assembly coming from the stock cvt intake boot is not a straight up assemly. The 22.5* elbow is to correct this. Add the next section of pvc tubing and then the 90* vent elbow. This will get you moving across to the right side of the bike. You will not be able to make this assembly fit correctly if you use a standard elbow. A section of tubing about 5" long and then the 45* elbow.

These components should look like this......






Last section to build. The CVT exhaust

Parts needed.......

2" shielded rubber coupler
1 1/2" 90* standard elbow - F to F
1 1/2" 45* street elbow
1 1/2" 22.5" street elbow
1 1/2" PVC tubing - approx 7 1/2" long
1 1/2" 90* standard elbow - F to F
1 1/2" PVC tubing - approx 3" long
1 1/2" rubber coupler
1 1/2" PVC tubing - approx 7 1/2" long
1 1/2" 90* vent elbow - F to F
1 1/2" PVC tubing - approx 1 1/4" long
1 1/2" 45* elbow - F to F

Attach the shielded rubber coupler to the stock cvt exhaust system on the bike. Remove the rubber boot that goes from the cvt exhaust system to the heat shield of course. Insert the 90* elbow into the rubber coupler pionting down along side of the heat shield. Use the 45* elbow to make the turn down parallel to the heat shield. The 22.5* elbow is needed to complete the leveling of the run. Add your tubing heading to the front of the bike. At the end of that run, connect the 90* elbow to start upward. A short section of pvc tubing to attach the rubber coupler to. Another section of tubing to get to the top. Add the 90* vent elbow. You must use the vent elbow here or it will not work. One more short section of tubing and then the 45* elbow.

your assembly should look like this......






Here is a pic of the CVT intake running under the gauge pod mount with the airbox intake assembly



Here is a pic of all three assemblies at the top



and one pic with the gauge pod installed and ports cut for the risers to be added to the assemblies.



For added insurance against heat related issues, I used water proof aluminum tape on areas near any exhaust components. All sections of snorks are assembled using outdoor clear silicon so that I may take the entire system apart if need be.

For some particulars, the cost is cheaper than purchasing a kit. Hopefully what I have provided above will save some trips to the hardware store if one decides to go this route. But one must figure what their time is worth. For me, I enjoy projects of such and the challenge they bring.

For this project, I removed almost all plastic from the Outty but I am also doing a Rubberdown Customs Rad relocate install at the same time. Removing all of the plastic definitely makes working much easier.

Here is a pic of the finished product.

Finally finished putting everything together and had to rebuild the risers as my handle bars were hitting the snorks. I liked the taller look but didn't want to make them crazy tall to clear the bars. May change out the hand guards to the ones that come on the XMR and see if I get any better clearance with the tall snorks. At any rate, here is a pic with the snorks and the RDC rad relocate installed. Took it out for a test run this past weekend and all worked great. Time to go play in the mud.


Hope you guys enjoy the post.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thank you very much mwilkins! I appreciate your work!!
 

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jrpro130 is there any way that you could repost the pictures on here? half of them are not coming up. I just bought a new outty and would like to see how to do it. if not no big deal
 

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I am planning on just doing the cvt exhaust snorkel and I don't really want to cut holes in my gauge pod. Do you think it is a bad idea to just keep the cvt exhaust snorkel under the gauge pod because it is blowing out "hot air". I don't know how hot the air gets coming out of there.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Outty1000 ill work on the pictures tomorrow

I am planning on just doing the cvt exhaust snorkel and I don't really want to cut holes in my gauge pod. Do you think it is a bad idea to just keep the cvt exhaust snorkel under the gauge pod because it is blowing out "hot air". I don't know how hot the air gets coming out of there.
Yeah I wouldn't recommend it., but people do it from time to time. It's called stealth snorkels.




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Outty1000 ill work on the pictures tomorrow



Yeah I wouldn't recommend it., but people do it from time to time. It's called stealth snorkels.




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I'm pretty sure the answer is yes but I would like to clarify ;) Do you not recommend it because of the heat or because it sits lower?
 

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Also does this cause your plastics to get pushed out a bit from the pvc running along side of the exhaust?
 

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And can this be done on an '09 Outty pod? Sorry if this question was asked already. I did some searching and came up with nothing. New guy here. Thx.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
I'll try to fix it when I get home. Look on can am forum there is a nice writeup that someone did. They used my design and perfected it
 

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Ok thanks. I'm just trying to get some pictures because I can find the really short 45 degree elbows. Only short one I can find are 22.5 and 60 degree
 

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Was the cvt exhaust pipe oval shape when you did this wtie up? Mine of not round and I can't get a coupler on it even after removing he end of the exhaust
 
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